Video Spoof’s ‘Pocahontas’ Warren

BREITBART — The Media Research Center pasted together a spoof of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) using an ad for the lineage site Ancestry.com as a play on Warren’s continually unsubstantiated claim that she is a descendant of Native Americans.

The spoof video that was released Tuesday uses an Ancestry.com ad with Warren’s face planted on the actress’s body as she talks about using the company’s DNA service to find out who she is and where she came from. “I couldn’t wait to get my pie chart,” the video continues.

The voice proclaims, “The most shocking result was that I’m 26 percent Native American, I had no idea. Just to know this is what I’m made of, this is where my ancestors came from. I absolutely want to know more about my Native American heritage. It’s opened up a whole new world for me.”

Warren’s 2012 senate race opponent Scott Brown challenged Warren’s Native American ancestry claim, calling for proof, but Warren failed to deliver it. CNN reported Monday Brown has renewed his request for proof, calling for Warren to take a DNA test. She has tried to pin her claims to family lore and a picture of her grandfather with “high cheekbones” like “the Indians did.”

After socialist darling Warren ranted about Trump in March, calling him a loser on Twitter, he shot back calling her “the Indian” during a press conference. In May, Trump called Warren “Pocahontas” as he accused her of likely doing the least among U.S. Senators and mocking her ancestry claim, “She said she was an Indian… because her cheek bones were high.”

Harvard appeared to have listed Warren as evidence of a diverse staff when she served there in the ‘90s. She listed herself as Native American in professional directories and as Cherokee for an entry in a Native American cookbook according to the Washington Post. The report also notes that while Warren claimed Cherokee and Delaware heritage, and Cherokee groups have called for documentation, she failed to produce it. The New England genealogical society could not find evidence of the native heritage.

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